Day 1: After 3 years, now what is happening in the quinoa fields?

Day 1: After 3 years, now what is happening in the quinoa fields?

Sixteen months have passed since I was last in Bolivia as a Fulbright scholar studying the quinoa.    How has life changed in this region as prices remain low, outside competition grows and Bolivia once again seems to be falling behind and forgotten in world markets?  My life has changed. I now have a more permeant position as a Professor of Business and Economics at Landmark College – where we specialize in bright students with dyslexia, autism, ADHD and other social and communication challenges.  I no longer assume how information is shared and materials presented, instead, I am always thinking about access, scaffolding, and neurodiversity.  It slows things down and creates new challenges – especially as I teach in a project-based learning way.  In a way, I feel my world has turned upside down.  It seems hard to get the students engaged and participating in my quinoa work with it being so far away, different and as yet, undefined.  They have challenges navigating their own local environment.  So I come to Bolivia this time, feeling a bit alone.  There is no new market or economic analysis project for next semester.  Rather this has become just my story – which I feel compelled to share with the world in a book, a movie and perhaps a new quinoa business.

Comments

  1. Hi Tamara, my very best wishes for your new job. I hope it will be of some comfort for you to know that your book is Recommended for my students 🙂
    Warm regards,
    Richard Hull
    Programme Director, MA Social Entrepreneurship
    Goldsmiths

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